The Beauty That Surrounds Us

This Webpage Is Intended To Accompany The 6 Information Boards Which Have Been Set Up At The Corresponding Locations

Kilfinane: Points of Interest

1. The Moat

Read more on: Kilfinane Coshlea Historical Society

2. Town Centre

Selection of 19th century buildings including a victualler, former shop, former hardware store and former bank

3. Market House

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

4. Captain’s Lane

Teach na Cille – House of Music – was opened on 2nd June 1974 as a centre for traditional Irish entertainment. It was the second such establishment in the county, following Murroe.

5. Staker Wallace monument

Read more on: Kilfinane Coshlea Historical Society

6. Roche’s Castle

Use Record Number LI048-057 in ‘Query Data’ tab on the National Monuments Service

7. Maple Ballroom

Read more on: Kilfinane Coshlea Historical Society

8. St. Andrews Church

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

9. Protestant Church ruin

Use Record Number LI048-058 in ‘Query Data’ tab on the National Monuments Service

10. St. Andrews Church of Ireland

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

11. Marian Shrine

Unveiled on 21st June 1959, the Shrine was built under the auspices of the local branch of Muintir na Tire. The project was in the charge of Michael Ryan, Kilfinane with Charles Quinn, Limerick, being the architect. The Shrine is composed of sandstone and mortar, which was hauled by hand, wheelbarrow and tractor from the site of the old mill and nearby buildings.

12. The Mill

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

13. Lady’s Well

Kevin Danaher’s Holy Wells of Limerick (1955) gives the following information: ‘Marked on 1928 edition of 6-inch O.S. map, but not on 1840 map. A clear bubbling spring in a grove of old whitethorn trees. Rounds are still made. The water cures sore eyes. Rags and small religious objects are left as offerings. Legends: The well moved from the place called “Sunday’s Well” in the same field. The water will not boil. A blind man who was being led to another well recognised the presence of this well and was cured at it.’

14. Ballyriggin Wood

Read more on: Our Irish Heritage

15. Killeen – earthwork with pillar stones

Use Record Number LI048-065001 in ‘Query Data’ tab on the National Monuments Service

 

Magners Mountain: Points of Interest

1. Seefin Mountain

Read more on: Mountain Views

2. Birds 

Download Birds and Butterflies booklet [pdf, 3MB]

3. Magner’s Mountain

4. Castle H (Oliver’s Folly)

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

5. Sliabh Riagh Mountain 

Read more on Mountain Views and Visit Ballyhoura

Note: The spellings of Sliabh Riagh are as numerous as the beautiful views from its slopes!

6. Carrigeen – Geological Formation

Flora and Fauna – trees, plants, insects, squirrels, fallow deer, wild goats

 

Glenbrohane: Points of Interest

1. Two wind turbines

Read more on: Windpower

2. King’s Chair at the Pinnacle on top of Sliabh Riagh

The Pinnacle gets its name from the sheer drop to the plains of Limerick, extending to the east. The group of stones known as the King’s Chair is so called due to local folklore that a king is buried at the summit.

3. Mass Rock

Use Record Number LI049-266 in ‘Query Data’ tab on the National Monuments Service

4. St. Patrick’s church Glenbrohane with Crib and Grotto 

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

5. Glenbrohane Community Hall, Wellness garden and Hub

6. Laraghlawe graveyard

Read more on: Historic Graves

7. Holy well – Tobereendoney (Sunday’s Well)

Kevin Danaher’s Holy Wells of Limerick (1955) gives the following information: ‘In the townland of Ballyfroota, it is a small well in a little grove of whitethorn trees, which overhang the well. Rounds are still made, but not very often. Rags are still hung on the bushes as offerings’.

8. The Jean Kennedy/Smith stone in memory of all the people who died or emigrated
during the Great Famine

Unveiled on 5th May 1997. After the ceremony, hundreds of attendees climbed the 464m Sliabh Riagh.

9. Ogham stone upon which are inscribed the names Maelagni, Magui, Gamati 

Use Record Number LI049-112 in ‘Query Data’ tab on the National Monuments Service

10. Ballingarry graveyard

Read more on: Historic Graves

11. Ballingarry Moat, excavated by John Hunt and local people in 1949 to 1951.

Some 2km east of St. Patrick’s Church, in use from the early Christian era to the 14th century. Among the finds were the remains of a clay and wattle house in which fires had been placed in the centre. Also two bronze pins, possibly dating to the 8th or 9th century, some shards of pottery, a bone comb, and some pieces of sharpened bone used to make holes in leather. Silver pennies dating from the reign of Edward I were also found.

12. Ballylanders bog

Located one mile south-west of Ballylanders village, it is a raised bog (100m) and reputed to be on the highest level plain in Munster. Dating from the end of the last glaciation some 10,000 years ago, its water supply is from natural rainfall and numerous springs rising within the bog. In all it extends to approx. 40 hectares. No turf has been cut here since the 1960s and in 1995 a raised timber walkway and viewing platform was opened to the public. The bog hosts a wide and seasonally-based variety of flora and fauna.

13. Duntryleague Passage tomb – Darby’s Bed

Use Record Number LI049-077 in ‘Query Data’ tab on the National Monuments Service

14. Ballinvreena Hall 

Read more on: Limerick.ie

 

Ballyorgan: Points of Interest

1. Keale River & Molanna Loop Walk

Read more on: Visit Ballyhoura and Discover Ireland

2. Castle Oliver gate lodge 

‘The Hayes family lived at the Ballyorgan Lodge. People in Ballyorgan refer to that lodge as the front lodge. People near the Ardpatrick lodge refer to that as the front lodge. Without doubt, the Ardpatrick Lodge was always the main entrance.’ © Castle Oliver and the Oliver Gascoignes (2008), by Nicholas Browne

3. Natural environment – Buzzards, Kingfishers, Flora & Fauna 

4. Kilflynn church   

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

5. Glenosheen – home of the Joyce brothers

Detailed article by Mannix Joyce

6. Castle H (Oliver’s Folly)  

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

7. Ballyhoura Mountain Bike Trails

Read more on: Visit Ballyhoura

8. Abbey of the Foreigners 

Use Record Number LI056-042002 in ‘Query Data’ tab on the National Monuments Service

 

Glenroe: Points of Interest

1. Keale River & Molanna Loop Walk

Read more on: Visit Ballyhoura and Discover Ireland

2. Darragh Cemetery

Use Record Number LI056-042002 in ‘Query Data’ tab on the National Monuments Service

3. GAA field

Glenroe GAA on Twitter, Facebook

4. Darragh Creamery

5. Darragh Hills loop

Read more on: Visit Ballyhoura and Limerick.ie

6. View of Galtymore 

Read more on: Mountain Views

7. Kilclooney Wood

Famously associated with the story of Peter O’Neill Crowley. Read more on: Library Ireland

8. Glenroe Community Centre

9. Glenroe Village

 

Ardpatrick: Points of Interest

Read Overview on Kilfinane Coshlea Historical Society

1. The Hill

Use Record Number LI056-002008 in ‘Query Data’ tab on the National Monuments Service

Also record number LI056-002006

2. Castle Oliver

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

3. Leaba Oscair

This ancient wedge tomb has recently (2020) been made more accessible following forestry work. Its plan, and the construction of the cyclopean side walls, with the corbel courses of smaller stones to take the covering stones (thus forming a rudely vaulted chamber), and the projecting stones at the western end forming the antae, all mark a different type of monument and a distinct cultural development.

4. Seefin Mountain

Read more on: Mountain Views

5. St. Patrick’s Church

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

6. The Sunvale Inn

Read more on: Buildings of Ireland

7. Bishop Murphy Park

Officially opened on 15th August 1989 by Patrick Murphy, brother of Bishop Henry [Bishop of Limerick 1958-1973]

8. St. Anne’s Well

Kevin Danaher’s Holy Wells of Limerick (1955) gives the following information: ‘Marked on 1840 map. A small oval well, about three by two feet, roughly walled with dry-stone to one foot over ground level. An old whitethorn tree grows over the well; there was a large poplar tree there formerly. No devotions now, but rounds were made up to about 1930. The water cured sore eyes; the cloth used to bathe the eyes was left as an offering. The feast of St Anne, 26th July, was a day of special devotion. The 1928 edition of the 6-inch O.S. map gives the name as “Tobar Fhionain” but local tradition is unanimous in rejecting this name.’

9. Round Tower

Use Record Number LI056-002003 in ‘Query Data’ tab on the National Monuments Service

10. St. Patrick’s Well

Kevin Danaher’s Holy Wells of Limerick (1955) gives the following information: ‘Marked on 1840 map. A shaft about two and a half feet square, now dry and filled with rubble to about six feet below ground level, but said to have been forty feet deep. Probably was the well which supplied water to the monastery. Rounds were made within living memory but are now discontinued. The water was said to cure rheumatism, lameness and rickets. Formerly much visited on 17th March. Legend: A person who could not see his reflection in the well would die within a year.’

11. The Greenwood and Ballyhoura Mountain Bike Trails

Read more on: Visit Ballyhoura

12. Mortalstown Ringfort 

Read more on: Kilfinane Coshlea Historical Society

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Take a stroll around Kilfinane…

https://adventurelab.page.link/KLyL

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